LOADING . . .

CBSE Solutions for Class 10 English

GSEB std 10 science solution for Gujarati check Subject Chapters Wise::

Why flora and fauna are under great stress?

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Due to insensitivity to our environment.


Name one vulnerable species of India.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Blue sheep, Asiatic elephant, Gangetic dolphin (Any One)


Name any one endangered species.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Black buck, crocodile, Indian wild ass, Indian rhino, lion tailed macaque, sangai (Any One)


Which organization of International level has classified existing plants and animal species of the world?

Hide | Show

જવાબ : International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN)


How much forest area was converted into agricultural land all over India according to the Forest Survey of India between 1951 and 1980?

Hide | Show

જવાબ : 26,200 sq. km.


What is biodiversity?

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Biodiversity is the variety of all living things, plants, animals and microorganisms living on the earth that are dependent on one other.


What are ‘Permanent Forest Estates’ and why? Which state has maximum forest cover falling under this category? Write its percentage share in the total forest area of this state.
 

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Reserved and protected forests are referred to as the Permanent Forest Estates maintained for the purpose of producing timber and other forest produce.
Madhya Pradesh has the largest area under permanent forests, constituting 75% of its total forest area.


Which agency manages forests in India? Name three broad categories in which the forests are classified.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : The forests in India are owned and managed by the Government through the Forest Department.
They are classified under the following categories:

  1. Reserved Forests
  2. Protected Forests
  3. Unclassed Forests


Write four steps taken by the Government for conservation of wildlife.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Five steps that have been taken to protect the wildlife in India:

  1. Under the Indian Wildlife Protection Act 1972, an All India list of protected species was published. The thrust was on protecting the remaining population of certain endangered species by –
    • banning hunting,
    • giving legal protection to their habitats and
    • restricting trade in wildlife.
  1. wildlife sanctuaries have been developed and National Parks have been set up.
  2. projects have been started for protecting specific animals which were gravely threatened, eg. Project Tiger, One-horned Rhino, the Kashmir Stag (hangul), three types of crocodiles —the fresh water, salt-water and Gharials, the Asiatic Lion, etc.
  3. recently, some animals have been given full or partial legal protection against hunting and trading throughout India, eg., Indian elephant, black buck, great Indian bustard and the snow leopard, etc.
Setting up of biosphere reserves for conserving flora and fauna in their natural surroundings and protection of wetland ecosystems is another step taken in this direction.


List various provisions made by “The Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act 1972” for protecting habitats.

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

  1. An All India list of protected species was published.
  2. The thrust was on protecting the remaining population of certain endangered species by-
    • banning hunting;
    • giving legal protection to their habitats and
    • restricting trade in wildlife.


Why do we need to conserve our biodiversity?

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Conservation of biodiversity is necessary because it:

  1. Preserves the ecological diversity.
  2. Preserves our life support systems, i.e., water, air and soil.
  3. Preserves the genetic diversity of plants and animals for better growth and breeding of species.
  4. Fisheries too are heavily dependent on the maintenance of aquatic biodiversity.


“The destruction of biodiversity is highly correlated with the loss of cultural diversity.” Give four facts to support this statement.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Such losses have:

  1. Increasingly marginalised and impoverished many forest dependent communities.
  2. Among the poor, women are affected more than men, for women bear the major responsibility of basic subsistence needs. With the depletion of these resources, the drudgery of women increased for they had to walk for more than 10 km to collect these resources which, in turn, affected their health and negligence of home and children.
  3. The indirect impact of degradation, eg. drought or floods etc. also hits the poor the hardest.
  4. Poverty is a direct outcome of environmental destruction.


Write four most important causes of environmental destruction/degradation.

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

  1. Unequal access to resources.
  2. Inequitable consumption of resources.
  3. Differential sharing of responsibility for environmental well being.
  4. Over-population.


List six factors which have led to the decline in India’s biodiversity.

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

  1. Habitat destruction
  2. Over-exploitation
  3. Environmental pollution
  4. Forest fires
  5. Hunting and Poaching
  6. Poisoning


Write three adverse impacts of dolomite mining in the Buxar Tiger Reserve on the ecosystem.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Adverse effects of dolomite mining in the Buxar Tiger Reserve:

  1. It has caused ecological damage.
  2. It has blocked the migration route of several species.
  3. It has disturbed the natural habitat of many species.


Write four major reasons for the depletion of forest cover.

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

  1. Deforestation for agricultural purposes.
  2. Shifting cultivation which is still practised in substantial parts of tribal belts.
  3. Large-scale development of river valley projects.
  4. Mining activities have also resulted in deforestation. For example, the tiger reserve in West Bengal is seriously threatened by the ongoing dolomite mining.
  5. Environmental pollution and forest fires have also led to depletion of forests.


Name any four resources which are obtained from our biodiversity.
 

Hide | Show

જવાબ : The resources are: wood, rubber, medicines and dyes.


Name six groups of flora and fauna under which they are classified by International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN).

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

  1. Normal species
    Species, whose population levels are considered to be normal for their survival.
  2. Endangered species
    Species, which are in danger of extinction because their population is declining. For example, Black buck, Indian rhino, lion-tailed macaque and Indian wild ass.
  3. Vulnerable resources
    These are the species whose population has declined so much that they are likely to move into endangered category in the near future, if negative factors continue to operate. For example, Blue sheep, Asiatic elephant, Gangetic dolphin.
  4. Rare species
    Species with small population. If care is not taken they may also become endangered species. For example, Himalayan Brown bear, desert fox, wild Asiatic buffalo, hornbill.
  5. Endemic species
    Species which are only found in particular areas usually isolated by natural or geographical barriers. For example, Andaman teal, Nicobar pigeon, Andaman wild pig.
  6. Extinct species
    These are species which are not found after searches of known or likely areas where they may occur, i.e., the species which were existing earlier, but are not seen today.


Name four animals and two species of flora which are on the verge of extinction.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Animals and plants on the verge of extinction:
Four animals: Cheetah, pink-headed duck, mountain quail, forest spotted owlet.
Two plants:

  1. Wild mahua (madhuca insignis)
  2. hubbardia heptaneuron (a species of grass).


____ are some of the densely populated regions.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : River plains


Heavy rains cause _____ in mountainous regions every year.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : landslide


____ is a major threat to the environment.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Desertification


____ is one of the ways to prevent soil erosion.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Counter ploughing


Terrace farming method is common in ____ regions

Hide | Show

જવાબ : mountain


Rainwater harvesting is compulsory in the state of _____

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Tamil Nadu


River Yamuna is getting polluted due to
 

Hide | Show

જવાબ : industrial affluents


The average water consumption per person is ___ cu km/year
 

Hide | Show

જવાબ : 6000


____ are normally sparsely populated.
 

Hide | Show

જવાબ : thick forests


Low-lying areas are susceptible to 
 

Hide | Show

જવાબ : water logging


Which of the following animals are protected under CITES?
 

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Dolphins


The life supporting system is known as
 

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Ecosystem


The zone of earth’s atmosphere where life exists is called
 

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Biosphere


The evaporation of water takes place due to

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Water Cycle


A dripping tap is capable of wasting approximately how much amount of water per year?

Hide | Show

જવાબ : 1200 litres


The moisture of soil can be retained by the process of

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Mulching


The process of piling up of rocks to prevent water flow is called

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Rock Dam


Which of the following is used to conserve the soil?

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Mulching


Overgrazing is responsible for causing

Hide | Show

જવાબ : soil depletion


Which part of soil is fit for vegetation?
 

Hide | Show

જવાબ : top soil


How much time is taken to form 1 cm of soil

Hide | Show

જવાબ : 100s of year


Which of the following states of India are notorious for witnessing maximum number of landslides
 

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Uttrakhand


Mass movement of rocks down the hills could be a sign of 

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Landslides


Soil is made up of

Hide | Show

જવાબ : organic materials & rocks


As the exposed rock break off and start decaying due to temperature change, this process is called

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Weathering


The type of soil is determined by

Hide | Show

જવાબ : landforms


Which of the following steps is a major threat to the environment?

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Desertification


An example of common property resource is

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Land for common usage


Private land properties are owned by

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Individuals


How much percent of earth’s area is occupied by land?

Hide | Show

જવાબ : 30


Write two characteristics of Joint Forest Management Programme and its two benefits for the community. Which Indian state started this programme first of all and when?

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Joint Forest Management Programme involves local communities in the management and restoration of degraded forests. It was first started in Orissa in 1988.
Two characteristics: It depends on—

  1. the formation of local (village) institutions that undertake protection activities mostly on degraded forest land managed by the Forest Department and
  2. the local communities also work towards restoration of such degraded forests.
Two benefits:

  1. The members of these communities are entitled to intermediary benefits like non-timber forest products.
  2. They are also entitled to share in the timber harvested by ‘successful protection’.


Explain the ‘Beej Bachao Andolan’ and ‘Navdanya’ concept.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Farmers and Citizens’ groups like the Beej Bachao Andolan in Tehri and Navdanya have shown that adequate levels of diversified crop production without the use of synthetic chemicals are possible and economically viable.


Write three examples of conservation of biodiversity at community level. (2025)

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Three examples of community participation:

  1. In ‘Sariska Tiger Reserve’, Rajasthan, villagers have fought against mining by citing the Wildlife Protection Act. In many areas, villagers themselves, are protecting habitats and explicitly rejecting Government involvement.
  2. The inhabitants of five villages in the Alwar District of Rajasthan have declared 1200 hectares of forest as the ‘Bhairodev Dakav Sonchuri’, declaring their own set of rules and regulations, which do not allow hunting, and are protecting the wildlife against any outside encroachments.
  3. The famous Chipko Movement in the Himalayas has successfully resisted deforestation and has also shown that community afforestation with indigenous species can be a great success.


What are unclassed forests? Name two areas which have high percentages of their forests as unclassed forests.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Unclassed forests are the other forests and waste lands belonging to both Government and private individuals as well as local communities.
Two areas with high percentage of unclassed forests are: North-Eastern states and parts of Gujarat.


Name five states which have large reserved and protected forests respectively.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Five states having large percentages of reserved forests are: Jammu and Kashmir, Andhra Pradesh, Uttrakhand, Kerala, Tamil Nadu, West Bengal and Maharashtra.
Protected Forests: Bihar, Haryana, Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, Orissa and Rajasthan.


Write the major differences between reserved and protected forests.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Difference between Reserved and Protected forests

Reserved forests

Protected forests

1. They cover more than half of the total forest area.

1. Almost V3 of the total forest area is protected forest.

2. They are most valuable from the point of view of forest and wildlife conservation.

2. These forest lands are protected from any further depletion.


What are ‘Permanent Forest Estates’ and why? Which state has maximum forest cover falling under this category? Write its percentage share in the total forest area of this state.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Reserved and protected forests are referred to as the Permanent Forest Estates maintained for the purpose of producing timber and other forest produce.
Madhya Pradesh has the largest area under permanent forests, constituting 75% of its total forest area.


Which agency manages forests in India? Name three broad categories in which the forests are classified.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : The forests in India are owned and managed by the Government through the Forest Department.
They are classified under the following categories:

  1. Reserved Forests
  2. Protected Forests
  3. Unclassed Forests


Write four steps taken by the Government for conservation of wildlife.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Five steps that have been taken to protect the wildlife in India:

  1. Under the Indian Wildlife Protection Act 1972, an All India list of protected species was published. The thrust was on protecting the remaining population of certain endangered species by –
    • banning hunting,
    • giving legal protection to their habitats and
    • restricting trade in wildlife.
  1. wildlife sanctuaries have been developed and National Parks have been set up.
  2. projects have been started for protecting specific animals which were gravely threatened, eg. Project Tiger, One-horned Rhino, the Kashmir Stag (hangul), three types of crocodiles —the fresh water, salt-water and Gharials, the Asiatic Lion, etc.
  3. recently, some animals have been given full or partial legal protection against hunting and trading throughout India, eg., Indian elephant, black buck, great Indian bustard and the snow leopard, etc.
  1. up of biosphere reserves for conserving flora and fauna in their natural surroundings and protection of wetland ecosystems is another step taken in this direction.


List various provisions made by “The Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act 1972” for protecting habitats.

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

  1. An All India list of protected species was published.
  2. The thrust was on protecting the remaining population of certain endangered species by-
    • banning hunting;
    • giving legal protection to their habitats and
    • restricting trade in wildlife.


What are the steps taken by Government to conserve flora and fauna of the country?

Hide | Show

જવાબ : • To protect flora and fauna, the Indian wildlife protection Act was implemented in 1972, with various provisions for protecting habitats.
• An all–India list of protected species was also published. The main aim of the program was towards protecting the remaining population of certain endangered species by banning hunting, giving legal protection to their habitats and restricting trade in wildlife.
• Central and many stage governments established national parks and wildlife sanctuaries.
• The central government announced several projects for protecting specific animals, which were gravely threatened, including the tiger, the one horned rhinoceros, the Kashmir stag etc.
• Most recently, the Indian elephant, black buck, the great Indian bustard and the snow leopard, etc. have been full or partial legal protection against hunting and trade throughout India.


Describe the role of the community in forest and wildlife conservation.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : • In Sariska Tiger Reserve, Rajasthan, villagers have fought against mining and destruction of forest by citing the Wildlife Protection Act.
• The inhabitants of five villages in the Alwar district of Rajasthan have declared 1,200 hectares of forest as the Bhairodev Dakav ‘Sonchuri’, declaring their own set of rules and regulations which do not allow hunting, and are protecting the wildlife against any outside encroachments.
• The Bishnois of Rajasthan are well known for protecting black bucks (chinkara) an endangered species, and herds of black buck, nilgai and peacocks can be seen as an integral part of the community and nobody harms them.
• The famous Chipko Movement in the Himalayas led by local communities, especially women, successfully resisted deforestation in several areas.
• Joint forest management (JFM) is a programme which involves local communities in the management and restoration of degraded forests.


What has been the contribution of the Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act in protecting habitats in India. Explain.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : The Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act was implemented in 1972, with various provisions for protecting habitats.
• An all-India list of protected species was also published.
• The main focus was on protecting the remaining population of certain endangered species by banning hunting, giving legal protection to their habitats, and restricting trade in wildlife.
• Central and many state governments established national parks and wildlife sanctuaries.
• The central government also announced several projects for protecting specific animals, which were seriously threatened such as tiger, one-horned rhinoceros etc. (Any three)


Distinguish between endangered species and extinct species of wild animals. Give one example of each.
 

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Endangered species:
• These are species which are in danger of extinction.
• The survival of such species is difficult if the negative factors that have led to a decline in their population continue to operate.
• Examples are black buck, crocodile, Indian wild ass, Indian rhino
Extinct:
• These are species which are not found after searches of known or likely areas where they may occur.
• A species may be extinct from a local area, region, country, continent or the entire earth. As, these species are finished, so they cannot be revived.
• Example – Asiatic cheetah, Pink-head duck.


What is biological diversity? Why biodiversity is important for human lives?

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Biological diversity means the variety of all living things, plants, animals and microorganisms living on the earth that are dependent on one other.
It is important for human lives because:
• Human beings depend on biodiversity for their very survival.
• The plants, animals and micro-organisms re-create the quality of air, water and soil which human use for their survival.


How many types of forest are classified in India? Explain it.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Forests are classified under the three categories:
• Reserved Forests: More than half of the total forests are declared as Reserved forests. They are maintained for the production of timber and other forest produce and for protective reasons.
• Protected Forests: Almost one-third of the total forest area is Protected forests. This forest land is protected from any further depletion.
• Unclassed Forests: These are other forests and wastelands belonging to both government and private individuals and communities.


‘Large-scale development projects have also contributed significantly to the loss of forests.’ Support the statement by giving examples.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : • Large-scale development projects need lands in large number to be implemented which result in the clearing of forests in that area.
• Since 1951, over 5,000 sq km of forest was cleared for river valley projects.
• Clearing of forests is still continuing with projects like the Narmada Sagar Project in Madhya Pradesh, which would inundate 40,000 hectares of forest.


Explain any three methods of forest conservation adopted by the government after independence.

Hide | Show

જવાબ : • The Indian wildlife Protection Act was implemented in 1972 with aim to protect wild life.
• Government established national parks, Biosphere reserves and Wildlife Sanctuaries.
• The central government announced several projects for protecting specific animals such as Project Tiger.


“Forests play a key role in the ecological system.” Highlight the value of forests in our life.
 

Hide | Show

જવાબ : • Forests play a key role in the ecological system as these are the primary producers on which all other living beings depend.
• It supports diverse flora and fauna which are part of our life.
• It provide us fruits, flowers, medicine, wood etc.


Write any three measures to conserve ecosystem?

Hide | Show

જવાબ : Three measures to conserve ecosystem are the following:
(i) Afforestation should be encouraged in the areas where deforestation takes place.
(ii) Awareness should be created among people about the importance of natural vegetation and wildlife.
(iii) Using non-conventional sources of energy such as solar, wind and tidal energy.


There are No Content Availble For this Chapter

1

Sariska National Park

A

Tamil Nadu

2

Gulf of Mannar Marine National Park

B

Uttarakhand

3

Jim Corbett National Park

C

Sariska National Park

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

1-C, 2-A, 3-B

1

Normal Species

A

Black Buck

2

Endangered Species

B

Blue Sheep

3

Vulnerable Species

C

Cattle

4

Rare Species

D

Himalayan Brown Bear

Answer-

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

1-C, 2-A, 3-B, 4-D

1

Normal Species

A

Asiatic Elephant

2

Endangered Species

B

Sal

3

Vulnerable Species

C

Wild Asiatic Buffalo

4

Rare Species

D

Crocodile

Answer-

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

1-B, 2-D, 3-A, 4-C

1

Normal Species

A

Desert Fox

2

Endangered Species

B

Pine

3

Vulnerable Species

C

Indian Ass

4

Rare Species

D

Asiatic Elephant

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

1-B, 2-C, 3-D, 4-A

1

state have less than 10% of their area under forests

A

Madhya Pradesh

2

state has the largest area under permanent forests

B

Haryana

3

state has the least area under permanent forests

C

Delhi

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

1-A, 2-C, 3-B

1

share of India in the total number of species in the world

A

15000

2

the approximate number of species of animals found in India

B

8%

3

flowering plants in India

C

81000

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

1-B, 2-C, 3-A

1

Normal Species

A

Gangetic Dolphin

2

Endangered Species

B

Hornbill

3

Vulnerable Species

C

Indian Rhino

4

Rare Species

D

Rodent

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

1-D, 2-C, 3-A, 4-B

1

Kaziranga National Park

A

Kerela

2

Gir Forest National Park

B

Himachal Pradesh

3

Great Himalayan National Park

C

Gujarat

4

Periyar National Park

D

Assam

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

1-D, 2-C, 3-B, 4-A

1

Ranthambore National Park

A

Uttarakhand

2

Mudumalai National Park

B

Rajasthan

3

Valley of Flowers National Park

C

Tamil Nadu

4

Valley of Flowers National Park

D

West Bengal

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

1-B, 2-C, 3-D, 4-A

1

Kanha National Park

A

Odisha

2

Navegaon National Park

B

Madhya Pradesh

3

Simlipal National Park

C

Maharashtra

Hide | Show

જવાબ :

1-B, 2-C, 3-A

Download PDF

Take a Test

Choose your Test :

Forest and Wildlife Resources

-.

આ પ્રકરણને લગતા વિવિધ એનિમેશન વિડીયો, હેતુલક્ષી પ્રશ્નો, ટૂંકા પ્રશ્નો, લાંબા પ્રશ્નો, પરિક્ષામાં પુછાઈ ગયેલા પ્રશ્નો તેમજ પરિક્ષામાં પુછાઈ શકે તેવા અનેક મુદ્દાસર પ્રશ્નો જોવા અમારી વેબસાઈટ પર રજીસ્ટર થાઓ અથવા અમારી App ફ્રી માં ડાઉનલોડ કરો.

Browse & Download CBSE Books For Class 10 All Subjects

The GSEB Books for class 10 are designed as per the syllabus followed Gujarat Secondary and Higher Secondary Education Board provides key detailed, and a through solutions to all the questions relating to the GSEB textbooks.

The purpose is to provide help to the students with their homework, preparing for the examinations and personal learning. These books are very helpful for the preparation of examination.

For more details about the GSEB books for Class 10, you can access the PDF which is as in the above given links for the same.